Stack It Up My clients enjoy manipulatives. Using stacking cups for articulation combines auditory, visual and kinesthetic modalities while practicing articulation. This activity works for any level of articulation practice, and can be adapted to target syntax and semantics. I reward kids with a cup after completing the target word or sentence, ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   July 01, 2017
Stack It Up
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   July 01, 2017
Stack It Up
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22072017.10
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22072017.10
My clients enjoy manipulatives. Using stacking cups for articulation combines auditory, visual and kinesthetic modalities while practicing articulation. This activity works for any level of articulation practice, and can be adapted to target syntax and semantics. I reward kids with a cup after completing the target word or sentence, and they can use their imaginations to build something, re-stack the cups, or just stack the cups back in a tall potato-chip container. In this particular activity, the student was so proud of his tower that he wanted me to take a picture and show it to other students throughout the day! In groups, they can work together to build while they take turns and use appropriate pragmatic language to talk with their peers during the activity. I love activities that work on target goals like articulation and also address social language, joint attention and problem-solving—all while having fun. I frequently find ideas like this from other SLPs on Pinterest and other social media.
About me:
I have been an SLP for 20 years, working with people of all abilities ages 3–21, primarily in the early intervention, school and home settings. I was an assistive technology specialist for a school system for four years and served as president of a local speech and hearing association for two years. I now serve clients in Tennessee through a private practice as a clinician in an elementary school. I love this wonderful work as an SLP and the many ways we continue to learn, change and adapt throughout our careers, and I like to share ideas with my colleagues through Instagram @tennesseeslp.
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July 2017
Volume 22, Issue 7