District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association Website: www.dcsha.org Facebook page: District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association Established: 1969 Members: 75 Contact: Martine Elie, president, president@dcsha.org DCSHA provides a mechanism for support, education and networking among professional members and students in the District of Columbia. One of our most pressing challenges had been maintaining membership numbers. ... State Spotlight
Free
State Spotlight  |   June 01, 2017
District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / State Spotlight
State Spotlight   |   June 01, 2017
District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The ASHA Leader, June 2017, Vol. 22, 66. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.22062017.66
The ASHA Leader, June 2017, Vol. 22, 66. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.22062017.66
Website: www.dcsha.org
Facebook page: District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Established: 1969
Members: 75
Contact: Martine Elie, president, president@dcsha.org
How are you making a difference in your members’ professional lives?
DCSHA provides a mechanism for support, education and networking among professional members and students in the District of Columbia.
What is the most significant challenge, unique circumstance or pressing frustration facing communication sciences and disorders professionals in your state today?
One of our most pressing challenges had been maintaining membership numbers. The District of Columbia is located between Maryland and Virginia and is not recognized as a state. Most of the DCSHA members live and/or work in D.C., Maryland or Virginia and may have membership in one or all of their local associations. Through the years, we have struggled to maintain our membership and have been fortunate to have ASHA intervene on our behalf to help us rejuvenate the association.
What is your association’s proudest accomplishment?
In addition to rejuvenating the association, we have been able to increase participation and attendance at our annual conference, held at the ASHA national office. Since we are a small association, having our annual conference at ASHA has allowed our members to visit the ASHA office and receive greetings from ASHA officers and staff. This has been a highlight for many of our members, especially student members who would not have the opportunity to visit the ASHA office otherwise.
What is a particularly memorable event in your association’s history and how did it come about?
The District of Columbia is not a state, but it does have a licensing board, and we were at the forefront of licensure efforts. Although it was a long and hard fight, D.C. established licensure requirements for audiologists and speech-language pathologists in 2006.
Do you have a particularly successful advocacy or recruitment strategy to share?
Washington, D.C., is home to three university master’s training programs. As such, we have partnered with the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association chapters to increase student and faculty participation in the organization. Most recently, we organized a professional affairs committee to address pressing student and faculty issues and concerns in audiology and speech-language pathology.
What should every communication sciences and disorders professional in D.C. know about the association?
DCSHA is a small organization that is run by dedicated volunteers. We seek to provide a basis for networking, collaboration and professional development for our members and interested parties.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
June 2017
Volume 22, Issue 6