MGH Receives $11.3 Million Grant to Research Vocal Hyperfunction A five-year, $11,305,665 grant will fund multidisciplinary, multi-institution research on preventing, diagnosing and treating vocal hyperfunction. The Clinical Research Center Grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders was awarded to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). This type of award, known as a P50 grant, supports an investigator-initiated ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2017
MGH Receives $11.3 Million Grant to Research Vocal Hyperfunction
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2017
MGH Receives $11.3 Million Grant to Research Vocal Hyperfunction
The ASHA Leader, June 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.22062017.10
The ASHA Leader, June 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.22062017.10
A five-year, $11,305,665 grant will fund multidisciplinary, multi-institution research on preventing, diagnosing and treating vocal hyperfunction.
The Clinical Research Center Grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders was awarded to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). This type of award, known as a P50 grant, supports an investigator-initiated research program that establishes a specialized, multi-disciplinary research and development center that may include patient care.
The center will bring together an interdisciplinary team of investigators across multiple institutions to study the causes of hyperfunctional voice disorders and responses to treatment, with the ultimate goal of improving prevention and clinical management of these conditions.
The principal investigator is Robert Hillman, co-director of the MGH Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation and professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School and adjunct professor at Boston University (BU). Other ASHA members participating in the center include Dimitar Deliyski (Michigan State University), Daryush Mehta (MGH and Harvard), Nelson Roy (University of Utah), Joseph Stemple (University of Kentucky), Cara Stepp (BU) and Jarrad Van Stan (MGH). Other researchers represent MIT, Clarkson University, Waterloo University (Canada) and Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria (Chile).
The center will investigate the many factors—behavioral, sensorimotor, environmental, psychological/emotional, physiological and biomechanical—that cause and maintain various manifestations of vocal hyperfunction. The investigation includes three major research projects and a scientific core that will include laboratory studies of sensorimotor and physiologic mechanisms; neural network modeling of voice motor control; computational and physical modeling of phonatory mechanisms; and ambulatory biosensors to investigate the factors’ potential differential impact.
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June 2017
Volume 22, Issue 6