Fluency Database Helps Researchers, Clinicians, Educators A new open-access, online resource is collecting stuttering and other fluency-related data for research, clinical and educational use. FluencyBank, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, is designed to help professionals in many fields who work with children and adults with fluency concerns. FluencyBank is ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   May 01, 2017
Fluency Database Helps Researchers, Clinicians, Educators
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   May 01, 2017
Fluency Database Helps Researchers, Clinicians, Educators
The ASHA Leader, May 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.22052017.10
The ASHA Leader, May 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.22052017.10
A new open-access, online resource is collecting stuttering and other fluency-related data for research, clinical and educational use.
FluencyBank, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, is designed to help professionals in many fields who work with children and adults with fluency concerns. FluencyBank is part of TalkBank—a larger database of speech video and audio files and linked text transcriptions—designed to foster fundamental research in communication.
As a web-based data repository, FluencyBank archives and preserves major data from well-known, published research in stuttering and fluency. Researchers can then combine data across labs to strengthen scientific investigations of stuttering, cluttering, and first- or second-language learning difficulty.
One part of the site designed to improve teaching in fluency disorders, allows instructors and students to view and evaluate interviews with adults who stutter. The videos link to transcripts. Speech-language pathology students can assess volunteers’ speech, as well as the affective and cognitive effects of their stuttering, using the Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSI) and the Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES).
Because the database is part of the larger TalkBank project, users can analyze a single speech and language sample in many ways.
FluencyBank has also developed clinical software to permit quicker and more accurate assessment of the speech and language profiles of adults and children who stutter or show atypical fluency behaviors. These fluency-analysis programs are available through free download of CLAN software. A clinician-friendly guide explains how to create speech samples and analyze them.
The International Cluttering Association is contributing samples of adults who clutter for educational purposes. FluencyBank is also recruiting data from non-English speakers; TalkBank permits analysis of more than a dozen languages.
Clinicians who want to assess clients and measure their progress can view and appraise quantitative and qualitative changes in conversational fluency. Students and instructors can identify individual differences as well as common features of stuttering across behavioral, cognitive and affective domains. Researchers’ data will be preserved for future research initiatives, and smaller projects can be shared to test research questions more robustly and in ways that can increase generalizability of findings.
For more information, contact principal investigators Nan Bernstein Ratner (nratner@umd.edu) or Brian MacWhinney (macw@cmu.edu).
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May 2017
Volume 22, Issue 5