Learning With Lights Students with profound and multiple disabilities require a lot of sensory input. Presenting relevant items that involve taste, touch, smell, vibrations, sound—and light—add life to a lesson. In preparing a sensory lesson for high school students with multiple disabilities, we planned to use lights to visually represent the Aurora ... Glimpses
Free
Glimpses  |   May 01, 2017
Learning With Lights
Author Notes
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   May 01, 2017
Learning With Lights
The ASHA Leader, May 2017, Vol. 22, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22052017.6
The ASHA Leader, May 2017, Vol. 22, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22052017.6
Students with profound and multiple disabilities require a lot of sensory input. Presenting relevant items that involve taste, touch, smell, vibrations, sound—and light—add life to a lesson. In preparing a sensory lesson for high school students with multiple disabilities, we planned to use lights to visually represent the Aurora Borealis (beautiful, color-changing light) and the Milky Way (many stars and a moon). However, we discovered the room wasn’t dark enough, so we attempted to build a portable sensory dome using an umbrella and heavy-duty plastic—albeit with some design flaws (trial and error is definitely part of the process!).
This concept generated a great deal of interest, and we are working on a grant to request a balance mat, a fixed wall umbrella and multiple lighting sources to create a more permanent sensory nook. We’ve noticed extremely high levels of engagement and communication in students while working with lights and we are excited to expand on this concept.
About me:
I’ve worked in public schools in Springfield, Missouri, since 2003, and I co-author the district’s blog for SLPs. Creating original treatment materials is a passion of mine. I am also on the board of Include Ozarks, a local nonprofit that provides opportunities for educational experiences and sensory-safe events for children with special needs.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2017
Volume 22, Issue 5