Special Interest Group 4, Fluency and Fluency Disorders I joined SIG 4 right after I earned my Certificate of Clinical Competence in 2001. I was starting to work with more and more children who stutter, and I was drawn to SIG 4 to observe the wealth of knowledge of the experts in the field. I was lucky ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   April 01, 2017
Special Interest Group 4, Fluency and Fluency Disorders
Author Notes
  • Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, is an assistant professor at Marshall University in the Department of Communication Disorders. Coleman is also the 2015–2017 coordinator of SIG 4. craig.coleman@marshall.edu
    Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, is an assistant professor at Marshall University in the Department of Communication Disorders. Coleman is also the 2015–2017 coordinator of SIG 4. craig.coleman@marshall.edu×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / ASHA News & Member Stories / Speech, Voice & Prosody / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   April 01, 2017
Special Interest Group 4, Fluency and Fluency Disorders
The ASHA Leader, April 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22042017.np
The ASHA Leader, April 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22042017.np
When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined SIG 4 right after I earned my Certificate of Clinical Competence in 2001. I was starting to work with more and more children who stutter, and I was drawn to SIG 4 to observe the wealth of knowledge of the experts in the field. I was lucky to come into the SIG when so many amazing leaders were on the Coordinating Committee. There was always a lot of passionate debate on the listserv, and the leadership conferences for our SIG were outstanding. When I look back on those early days in my career, I think I got a lot out of being able to meet and network with people in our field. I continue to have so much respect for the work the people in SIG 4 do every day.
How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
Like most new clinicians, I started by just observing the listserv. As I started to get more involved in stuttering work, I was asked to participate in a project with the SIG to help get a new CPT code for stuttering evaluations in 2010. I enjoyed the collaboration and decided to run for the Coordinating Committee. I spent a year on the committee and then moved to associate coordinator. In that role, I helped lead the effort to create the childhood stuttering Practice Portal. After two years as associate coordinator, I was elected coordinator. This is my third year as SIG 4 coordinator and I am a candidate this year for ASHA vice president for speech-language pathology practice. I cannot say enough about how being involved in the SIG has helped me by giving me a leadership opportunity working with such a great team.
How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
If you are really passionate about something, you always find time. I have been lucky to have a terrific chair and colleagues at my department at Marshall University. They see the value of my opportunities with ASHA and have always fully supported me. There are so many of you out there who have the talent and skills needed to be effective leaders in a SIG. Don’t be afraid to get involved in any capacity you can. ASHA needs good people to be involved. Take the leap. You will always find support in your SIG.
I always tell my students that when I was in school, being involved in professional organizations was something that was seen as above and beyond. I want them to see it as a necessary part of what we do each day in our work. There are too many important legislative and reimbursement issues that challenge us to ignore them. We have to be advocates for our profession, or no one else will.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about? Chats, conferences or convention events?
We have a short course and seminar planned for the ASHA Convention in November. All of these articles and sessions always include information that is clinically relevant and will help clinicians in their everyday practice. We also recently collaborated on a webpage with the American Academy of Pediatrics and our associate coordinator, John Tetnowski, helped co-author an ASHA Leader article on stuttering and discrimination.
What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
Our SIG always has really good Perspectives articles. “An Introduction to Camps for Children Who Stutter: What They Are and How They Can Help,” presents a nice overview of several different summer programs for children who stutter. I really like it because of the diversity of the programs. The more options for children who stutter, the more opportunities for growth.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2017
Volume 22, Issue 4