Active Boys May Develop Stronger Reading Skills Young boys on the go may be better readers than their more sedentary peers, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have found a link between the amount of time boys in first grade spend being physically active and their development of reading skills in the ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2017
Active Boys May Develop Stronger Reading Skills
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2017
Active Boys May Develop Stronger Reading Skills
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22032017.11
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22032017.11
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have found a link between the amount of time boys in first grade spend being physically active and their development of reading skills in the following two years. Time spent more statically was also associated with negative effects on math.
“We found that lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, higher levels of sedentary time, and particularly their combination, were related to poorer reading skills in boys,” the study says.
However, the study authors, led by Eero A. Haapala of Eastern Finland’s Institute of Biomedicine, found no such connection in girls. The research appeared in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport.
The researchers tracked “moderate-to-vigorous physical activity” (relative to “light physical activity”) and sedentary time via measurements of metabolic equivalents in 89 boys and 69 girls ages 6–8 through a combined heart-rate and movement sensor—which the participants wore continuously for a minimum of four days—and a body-fat percentage indicator. They measured reading and math skills with standardized tests in first, second and third grade.
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March 2017
Volume 22, Issue 3