Feds Target Disparities in Special Education A new rule from the U.S. Department of Education aims to make sure that minority students aren’t overrepresented in special education. Under current Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) regulations, states must identify school districts with disproportionate rates of students from particular racial or ethnic groups in restrictive settings or ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   March 01, 2017
Feds Target Disparities in Special Education
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School-Based Settings / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   March 01, 2017
Feds Target Disparities in Special Education
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 7. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.22032017.7
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 7. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.22032017.7
A new rule from the U.S. Department of Education aims to make sure that minority students aren’t overrepresented in special education.
Under current Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) regulations, states must identify school districts with disproportionate rates of students from particular racial or ethnic groups in restrictive settings or experiencing the most severe forms of discipline, such as suspension or expulsion.
But because states and districts use different measures of “significant disproportionality,” few districts are identified. The new rule, however, holds all school districts to the same standard.
Under the rule, which takes effect July 1, 2018, school districts flagged for overrepresentation or underrepresentation of students from particular backgrounds in special education, in segregated settings, or for disciplinary measures must review policies and practices to identify causes and address those causes in a comprehensive program of services for all children—with and without disabilities—from age 3 through grade 12.
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March 2017
Volume 22, Issue 3