Fine-Motor Fun I used the snowman craft (by Danielle at Speech Dreams) with kindergarten students who are second-language learners and who have language impairments. We worked on making sentences using opposite adjectives as we made each fold in the paper. I didn’t tell them what we were making—they had to predict ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   March 01, 2017
Fine-Motor Fun
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Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   March 01, 2017
Fine-Motor Fun
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22032017.4
The ASHA Leader, March 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22032017.4
I used the snowman craft (by Danielle at Speech Dreams) with kindergarten students who are second-language learners and who have language impairments. We worked on making sentences using opposite adjectives as we made each fold in the paper. I didn’t tell them what we were making—they had to predict what it would be and say why they thought that. When they were finished, they were so proud that they asked their teacher to hang it on the classroom door.
I use the hashtag #SLPShoutOut and a tag of the author’s store when I use products developed by speech-language pathologists on the Teachers Pay Teachers website. It is important to credit authors for their products as indicated in the ASHA Code of Ethics (Rule IV-K).
About me:
For the last 15 years, I have worked in public schools and skilled nursing/long-term care. One of my goals for this school year has been to incorporate more fine-motor activities into my speech and language groups, especially with my early-childhood students. I am also the author/creator of therapy products created for Ms. Gardenia’s Speech Room.
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March 2017
Volume 22, Issue 3