Members Making News Austin Speech Labs, a nonprofit organization founded by speech-language pathologists Shelley Adair and Shilpa Shamapant that provides speech treatment for stroke survivors and support and education for caregivers, received the National Stroke Association’s 2016 Raising Awareness in Stroke Excellence Award for Most Impactful Stroke Organization … Kari B. Comer, ... People
Free
People  |   February 01, 2017
Members Making News
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / People
People   |   February 01, 2017
Members Making News
The ASHA Leader, February 2017, Vol. 22, 22-25. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.22022017.22
The ASHA Leader, February 2017, Vol. 22, 22-25. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.22022017.22
Awarded
Austin Speech Labs, a nonprofit organization founded by speech-language pathologists Shelley Adair and Shilpa Shamapant that provides speech treatment for stroke survivors and support and education for caregivers, received the National Stroke Association’s 2016 Raising Awareness in Stroke Excellence Award for Most Impactful Stroke Organization … Kari B. Comer, clinical educator and adjunct professor at The George Washington University, received one of the 2016 Ten Outstanding Young Americans awards from the nonprofit Junior Chamber International’s U.S. organization. The award is given annually to 10 Americans who are accomplished in their field and give back to their communities … Ramesh Kaipa, assistant professor and program director in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Oklahoma State University, received the 2016 College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award. The award recognizes instructors who have made significant contributions to teaching and demonstrate passion for teaching and for their given area of expertise … Rik Lemoncello, associate professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Pacific University Oregon, was named the school’s Tommy Thompson Distinguished Professor in Education. The award includes an endowed fund to develop a sustainable, interprofessional bakery for adults with acquired brain injury to support vocational training … Mary S. Wilson, president and CEO of Laureate Learning Systems, received the 2016 Spirit of Philanthropy Award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. The award recognizes extraordinary volunteer service to the ASHFoundation with widespread impact in the area of philanthropy.
In the media
Soo-Eun Chang, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and director of the speech neurophysiology lab at the University of Michigan, was featured in an Aug. 8 news article on the Dana Foundation website about her and others’ work in advancing stuttering researchKit Frank, an audiologist at the New York University Langone Medical Center, was featured in a Nov. 21 “TODAY” show segment about potentially dangerous sound levels at movie theatersJulie Norin, director of audiology at The Hearing and Speech Agency, was featured on a recent news segment on Baltimore local channel ABC2, speaking about how people of all ages can protect themselves from noise-induced hearing lossLuis F. Riquelme, chair of the American Board of Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders and associate professor of speech-language pathology at New York Medical College, and Inoka Tennakoon, an SLP at a Lorien Health skilled-nursing facility in Columbia, Maryland, were featured in a Dec. 1 Baltimore Sun article about video games used in treatment of people with dysphagiaTom Shull, SLP in the Boston Public Schools, was featured in a Nov. 21 Boston Globe article about teachers’ crowd-sourced fundraising efforts for various student needs. Shull has raised more than $25,000 in the past five years … Lynda Katz Wilner, an Owings Mills, Maryland–based SLP and founder and director of Successfully Speaking, was interviewed for a Nov. 29 AHA! Business Radio segment, discussing the elements of a polished professional presence.
On the move
Melissa Duff has joined the faculty of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine as associate professor of hearing and speech sciences … Helen Sharp recently joined Pacific University Oregon as professor and director of the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She previously served as an associate professor at Western Michigan University … Stephen M. Wilson has joined the faculty of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine as assistant professor of hearing and speech sciences.
Retired
Martin A. Fischer, director of the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Pacific University Oregon, has retired as professor emeritus. Fischer received his doctoral degree from the University of Oregon and was instrumental in the development of several university programs, including those at Pacific University, Missouri State University, Western Carolina University and Oklahoma State University-Tulsa. He was the founding director of the Scottish Rite Center for Childhood Language Disorders at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., with a concurrent appointment in the Department of Pediatrics at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Fischer is an ASHA Fellow and received the Council on Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders’ Award for Distinguished Contributions. He is the co-founder and CEO of the Master Clinician Network, which provides peer-reviewed examples of evidence-based clinical practice for observation and critical discourse.
Deaths
Duane Irving Anderson, 86, on Sept. 23, 2016. Anderson earned his bachelor’s degree from Western Washington University’s College of Education and his doctor of education degree in audiology and speech-language pathology from the University of Oregon. Early in his career, Anderson was the founding director of the Eugene Hearing and Speech Center, later working in the Washington and Oregon state health departments as a manager of statewide hearing programs for children. He served as the executive secretary for the Oregon Board of Examiners for Speech Pathology and Audiology and as a staff member at Tillamook County (Oregon) General Hospital. After 30 years in the public sector, he formed his company, Hearing Conservation Services, providing a variety of services for people with hearing loss. Anderson received many awards, most recently the Lifetime Achievement Award from Western Washington University and the Outstanding Service to the Academy award from the Oregon Academy of Audiology. Anderson operated his business until the time of his death.
Glen Robert “Bob” Buckendorf, 67, on Aug. 28, 2016, in Salt Lake City of a stroke. Buckendorf earned his bachelor’s degree from the College of Idaho in 1971, his master’s degree from Idaho State University in 1975 and his PhD from Wichita State University in 1997. He worked in schools until opening his private practice in 1979 in Hillsboro, Oregon, which he ran through 1999. That year, he joined the faculty at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) as an assistant professor. In 2006, he became a clinical assistant professor at OHSU and reopened his private practice to work with his son and daughter-in-law, who are also SLPs. Buckendorf also served as an adjunct faculty member at Portland State University. His interests focused on pediatric speech and language disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), language disorders, phonological disorders, craniofacial disorders and fluency disorders. He served as president of the Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association and the Oregon Speech Pathology Academy, and was a board member for the Northwest Early Childhood Institute and Professionally Speaking. He presented internationally on child-directed interventions for children with ASD and co-authored several book chapters. He retired in 2016.
Natalie Chalkley Mirkovich, 88, on Nov. 6, 2016, in Burbank, California. Mirkovich began her education at Lone Mountain College in San Francisco, but left to start a family with her husband. At 63, after raising 12 children, she returned to school and earned a bachelor’s degree in music in 1991 from California State University, Northridge. After her husband died, Mirkovich continued her studies at the university and earned her master’s degree in speech-language pathology in 1997 when she was 69. For 17 years, she worked as an SLP with infants, children, teenagers and adults. Before retiring at 87, she worked with geriatric clients at two adult day health care centers.
Richard Glen Stoker, 69, on Nov. 3, 2016, in Green Valley, Arizona. Stoker, who was profoundly deaf, began his professional career in chemistry before returning to the University of Utah to earn a master’s degree in education of the deaf. Stoker held a variety of positions at academic institutions around the world, including the University of Alabama, University of Salford (United Kingdom) and McGill University (Montreal, Canada), where he received his PhD in communication disorders. He then joined the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. During his tenure at PSU, Stoker mentored several PhD and master’s students and was involved with the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf. His career also included time as a professor at McGill and director of the Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, and in the mid-1900s, as a senior scientist at Bell-Northern Research in Ottawa. He also joined a think-tank group developing early concepts for telemedicine and high-tech consumer products. Stoker retired in the late 1990s.
Ralph Joseph Stoudt, Jr., 88, on Oct. 28, 2016, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Stoudt earned a bachelor’s degree from Albright College in 1960 and then attended Princeton Theological Seminary. He received his master’s degree from the University of Virginia (UVA) and his doctorate from the University of Michigan. Stoudt then joined the faculty at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and also taught at George Peabody College. In 1966, he became an associate professor at UVA in what is now the speech communication disorders department, teaching graduate and undergraduate speech-language pathology courses. During his 29 years at UVA, he was also a consultant to St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C. He was president and Fellow of the Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Virginia and an ASHA legislative councilor. Stoudt played a major role in establishing licensure in audiology and speech-language pathology in Virginia, one of the first states to do so.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2017
Volume 22, Issue 2