Social Media: A Powerful Tool for AAC Learning and Networking Using these tips, people who use augmentative and alternative communication can harness social media to tell their stories and connect with others. Get Social
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Get Social  |   February 01, 2017
Social Media: A Powerful Tool for AAC Learning and Networking
Author Notes
  • Lauren S. Enders, MA, CCC-SLP, is an augmentative communication consultant at the Bucks County Intermediate Unit in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She provides students with complex communication needs access to robust language through AAC. Enders also presents locally and nationally on topics related to AAC and shares resources via social media. She’s also an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Follow her on her sites listed above or on Twitter. lasenders@me.com
    Lauren S. Enders, MA, CCC-SLP, is an augmentative communication consultant at the Bucks County Intermediate Unit in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She provides students with complex communication needs access to robust language through AAC. Enders also presents locally and nationally on topics related to AAC and shares resources via social media. She’s also an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Follow her on her sites listed above or on Twitter. lasenders@me.com×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Get Social
Get Social   |   February 01, 2017
Social Media: A Powerful Tool for AAC Learning and Networking
The ASHA Leader, February 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.22022017.np
The ASHA Leader, February 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.22022017.np
A commonly mentioned challenge from those who support users of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) involves a lack of adequate knowledge and training. If access to speech-language pathologists specializing in AAC is limited, how can we learn about valuable AAC-related resources?
One answer lies at our fingertips. If you know where to look, social media can provide a powerful tool for networking opportunities with SLPs working with AAC users or other AAC experts. Additionally, social media offers a platform for resource sharing and curation of useful information among those knowledgeable about AAC.
Some of the most popular social media platforms used by the AAC community include blogs, Facebook pages or groups, Pinterest, and YouTube.
Blogs
  • AAC Intervention: Caroline Musselwhite taps into her 30 years of experience to offers tips, products and presentation handouts.

  • Jane Farrrall Consulting: Jane Farrall shares excellent information on literacy, AAC and assistive technology. Her site also includes a helpful and frequently updated list of AAC apps.

  • PraacticalAAC: This prolific searchable blog—created by Carole Zangari and the late Robin Parker of Nova Southeastern University in South Florida—offers daily posts with high-quality resources including articles, videos, product highlights, from professionals and families in the AAC community.

  • Stories of a Seasoned AAC SLP: This blog from Gail Van Tatenhove offers helpful implementation strategies and stories.

  • Teaching Learners with Multiple Special Needs: This blog offers guidance and resources from Kate Ahern who is an assistive technology specialist and teacher of students with complex communication needs.

  • Uncommon Sense Blog: Written by Dana Nieder, this blog offers an interesting viewpoint because Nieder is a mom to a spunky little girl using AAC and is completing graduate school to become an SLP.

Facebook pages and groups
  • AAC for the SLP: This group offers a place for SLPs working with AAC users to post questions, find resources and participate in discussions about related issues.

  • AAC Through Motivate, Model, Move Out of the Way: This group, created by Kate Ahern, aims to “share how to use motivating activities and interactions, modeling and fading supports to increase independence to support AAC users in becoming competent communicators.”

  • Lauren S. Enders, MA, CCC-SLP: On my professional Facebook page, I curate and post resources related to AAC every day.

  • PrAACtical AAC: By liking this page, you will see posts from PrAACtical AAC in your newsfeed.

  • Rachael Langley, AAC Specialist: Langley is an SLP who shares resources such as the latest AAC technology or innovations, as well as original AAC memes and posters.

In addition, check out user groups and pages for dedicated devices and AAC apps. In addition to sharing useful resources, these pages can be a way to get speedy technical support from an employee or an experienced user. Simply search the name of a company or AAC System to find company sites or device user groups.
Pinterest boards
YouTube channels: Videos to demonstrate device features and operation as well as models of best practices in implementation.
Although these AAC-related social media sites and pages only make up a subsection of those available, they will get you started in making new connections and finding respected resources. If you need more information on how to serve those using AAC, these sites can help you provide best practices and approaches for your clients or students.
1 Comment
February 8, 2017
Michelle Therrien
additional resources
I'd add these two to the list. Such good resources for working with young children and for implementing literacy programs!

-aackids.psu.edu
-aacliteracy.psu.edu
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February 2017
Volume 22, Issue 2