Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy Linked to Language Disorders in Children Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) taken during pregnancy may be associated with a higher risk of language disorders in children, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. Columbia University researchers found that children of mothers who took SSRIs while pregnant have a 37 percent higher risk ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   January 01, 2017
Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy Linked to Language Disorders in Children
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Language Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   January 01, 2017
Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy Linked to Language Disorders in Children
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22012017.16
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22012017.16
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) taken during pregnancy may be associated with a higher risk of language disorders in children, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.
Columbia University researchers found that children of mothers who took SSRIs while pregnant have a 37 percent higher risk of developing speech-language disorders than children of mothers who have depression but are not taking SSRIs. However, the researchers note that while the overall effect is significant at a population level, the individual-scale risk is small (a 1-percent risk in depressed but unmedicated pregnant women and a 1.37-percent risk in pregnant women who took SSRIs).

The researchers note that while the overall effect is significant at a population level, the individual-scale risk is small.

The study, led by Alan Brown, Columbia University Medical Center professor of psychiatry and epidemiology, looked at three different groups of Finnish mothers and offspring from 1996 to 2010: 15,596 mothers who were depressed and took SSRIs during pregnancy; 9,537 mothers who were depressed but did not take SSRIs during pregnancy; and 31,207 mothers who were not diagnosed as depressed and did not take SSRIs during pregnancy.
Both groups of depressed women had higher risks of having children with language disorders than the group of women who were not depressed and also unmedicated.
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January 2017
Volume 22, Issue 1