Feds Weigh in on Tech Use in Early Education Using technology appropriately with young children can help them learn in new ways, according to a new policy brief issued by the federal Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services. The brief, developed in consultation with the American Academy of Pediatrics, is designed to help people who ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   January 01, 2017
Feds Weigh in on Tech Use in Early Education
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News in Brief   |   January 01, 2017
Feds Weigh in on Tech Use in Early Education
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.22012017.12
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.22012017.12
Using technology appropriately with young children can help them learn in new ways, according to a new policy brief issued by the federal Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services.
The brief, developed in consultation with the American Academy of Pediatrics, is designed to help people who care for the nation’s 36 million early learners (birth to 8 years) make decisions about media use. The brief centers on four guiding principles:
  • Technology, when used properly, can be a tool for learning.

  • Technology should be used to increase access to learning opportunities for all children.

  • Technology may be used to strengthen relationships among parents, families, early educators and young children.

  • Technology is more effective for learning when adults and peers interact or co-view with young children.

Each principle in the brief includes expanded information. The second principle (increasing access to learning for all children), for example, discusses cultural responsiveness, how technology supports science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and early learning, the digital use divide, and using technology with children with disabilities and dual-language learners.
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January 2017
Volume 22, Issue 1