Autism Speaks Drops ‘Cure’ From Mission The new mission statement and agenda of Autism Speaks, the nation’s largest autism advocacy organization, no longer include finding a cure for autism. The organization’s board of directors voted to modify the statement in late 2015, the first change since the nonprofit’s 2005 establishment. “Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   January 01, 2017
Autism Speaks Drops ‘Cure’ From Mission
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   January 01, 2017
Autism Speaks Drops ‘Cure’ From Mission
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.22012017.11
The ASHA Leader, January 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.22012017.11
The new mission statement and agenda of Autism Speaks, the nation’s largest autism advocacy organization, no longer include finding a cure for autism.
The organization’s board of directors voted to modify the statement in late 2015, the first change since the nonprofit’s 2005 establishment.
“Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the lifespan, for the needs of individuals with autism and their families through advocacy and support; increasing understanding and acceptance of autism spectrum disorder; and advancing research into causes and better interventions for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions,” the statement reads. “Autism Speaks enhances lives today and is accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.”
The revision reflects a broad shift for the organization, which was established through the merger of several advocacy groups including Cure Autism Now, according to board member Stephen Shore, a clinical assistant professor of education at Adelphi University.
“Autism Speaks was founded on the goal of curing autism as one of its objectives,” says Shore, who is on the spectrum. “However, similar to many experiences of parents of children with autism, the organization grew to believe that autism is something to be worked with for promoting fulfilling and productive lives of people on the spectrum—rather than something that has to be done to.”
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January 2017
Volume 22, Issue 1