Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders I joined SIG 2 early in my career when SIGs were still known as “Special Interest Divisions” and all the Perspectives arrived via snail mail. (Curious as to when that was, I looked in the SIG Volunteer Leadership Handbook to check out the history. They were formed in the ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   November 01, 2016
Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Author Notes
  • Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, MA, is the director of the Aphasia Treatment Program at California State University, East Bay. She is an affiliate of and served on the Professional Development Committee of ASHA Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, from 2013 to 2016. ellen.bernstein-ellis@csueastbay.edu
    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, MA, is the director of the Aphasia Treatment Program at California State University, East Bay. She is an affiliate of and served on the Professional Development Committee of ASHA Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, from 2013 to 2016. ellen.bernstein-ellis@csueastbay.edu×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Language Disorders / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   November 01, 2016
Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.21112016.np
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.21112016.np
When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined SIG 2 early in my career when SIGs were still known as “Special Interest Divisions” and all the Perspectives arrived via snail mail. (Curious as to when that was, I looked in the SIG Volunteer Leadership Handbook to check out the history. They were formed in the late 1980s–early 1990s.) As a new clinician in a VA hospital setting, I remember being excited and grateful to have access to relevant, current articles authored by leading researchers and clinicians. I felt it was an important way to keep learning post-graduate school. Many years later, it’s still a valuable and affordable source of CEUs.
How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
In terms of benefit to my own professional education, reading the latest information about critical issues in neurogenic communication disorders certainly has informed my clinical choices and better prepared me in my clinical work. There was a period when I had very limited journal access outside the ASHA publications. The SIG publications felt like a lifeline to current literature during that time. Now, the online community is another welcome source of information and exchange.
In terms of the benefit of being a SIG volunteer, I have met some wonderful colleagues and developed a far better understanding of the resources available through ASHA, like the Practice Portal and Evidence Maps. It’s given me a personal connection to ASHA.
How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
With most of the SIG’s Professional Development Committee [PDC] interactions taking place via email, volunteering flexes easily to fit my time schedule—and it’s a very manageable commitment. Let your supervisor know that your involvement will increase your exposure to ASHA resources, which in turn will benefit what you bring back to your job! Reach out to someone you recognize on the SIG 2 leadership list to learn more. Or contact Erin Mattingly, our friendly and knowledgeable professional development manager, who is always receptive to interest in the SIG.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about? Chats, conferences or convention events?
At every ASHA conference, the SIG 2–sponsored ASHA presentations are often among my favorites. I’ve enjoyed the ideas and resources from the web chats—both live and archived versions. It’s great to be able to quickly view all the topics.
What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
I have been thinking a lot about outcomes measurement in aphasia, so I really appreciated the excellent set of articles in the June 2015 issue. I also really like the group of articles about aphasia treatment in the June 2014 issue. From that issue specifically, I have repeatedly recommended Lisa Edmonds’ article, “Tutorial for Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST): Detailed Description of the Treatment Protocol with Corresponding Theoretical Rationale,” to students, and just this week I’ve been discussing Jacqueline Hinckley’s “Facilitating Life Participation in Severe Aphasia with Limited Treatment Time,” with several colleagues. Her description of how to make sure that assessment leads to meaningful patient-centered goals has really made me rethink how I approach my evaluations.
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November 2016
Volume 21, Issue 11