Close to a Quarter of Americans Have Hearing Loss An estimated 38.3 million U.S. residents ages 12 and older—23 percent of that population—have some degree of hearing loss, according to a study conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers Adele M. Goman and Frank R. Lin. For the study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, the researchers analyzed 2001–2010 ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2016
Close to a Quarter of Americans Have Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2016
Close to a Quarter of Americans Have Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.21112016.9
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.21112016.9
An estimated 38.3 million U.S. residents ages 12 and older—23 percent of that population—have some degree of hearing loss, according to a study conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers Adele M. Goman and Frank R. Lin.
For the study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, the researchers analyzed 2001–2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on 9,648 people age 12 years and older. Hearing loss was defined as mild (25–40 dB), moderate (40–60 dB), severe (60–80 dB) or profound (more than 80 dB).
Analysis shows that 25.4 million have mild better-ear hearing loss, 10.7 million have moderate hearing loss, 1.8 million have severe loss, and 0.4 million have profound loss. Older people displayed a higher prevalence and more severe levels of hearing loss. Across most ages, the prevalence was higher among Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites than among non-Hispanic blacks, and was higher among men than women.
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November 2016
Volume 21, Issue 11