Document Advises Clinicians What to Do if They Suspect Violations A new consensus statement—issued by ASHA and three other organizations—outlines steps to take if clinicians in health care settings are concerned about potential violations of laws, regulations or policies in their facilities. The statement was developed by staff from ASHA, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), the American Physical Therapy ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2016
Document Advises Clinicians What to Do if They Suspect Violations
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Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News & Member Stories / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2016
Document Advises Clinicians What to Do if They Suspect Violations
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21112016.8
The ASHA Leader, November 2016, Vol. 21, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21112016.8
A new consensus statement—issued by ASHA and three other organizations—outlines steps to take if clinicians in health care settings are concerned about potential violations of laws, regulations or policies in their facilities.
The statement was developed by staff from ASHA, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and the National Association for the Support of Long-Term Care.
The organizations developed and issued the document in response to concerns about practices in some health care settings that may conflict with clinical judgment and patient needs. The first consensus document in response to these concerns—focused on supporting clinical judgment in service delivery—was developed and issued in 2014 by ASHA, AOTA and APTA.
The compliance document also responds to anecdotal reports from staffing companies and health care organizations that clinicians hesitate to use facility or staffing company compliance programs to address concerns, believing that they will not be protected. The statement clarifies the legal protections of the compliance-reporting process.
The statement includes explanations of compliance, corporate compliance programs, and confidentiality versus anonymity, and recommends steps for reporting:
  • Immediately stop engaging in any activity that you believe to be a compliance violation.

  • Discuss concerns and questions with your immediate supervisor. Concerns are best addressed directly, but only compliance officers are legally bound to ensure confidentiality and whistleblower protections.

  • Contact your facility and/or corporate compliance officer or hotline. Go to the compliance officer for your direct employer if you are not employed by the facility where you work. If they do not respond satisfactorily, you can go to your facility compliance officer as well.

  • If you are unable to satisfactorily resolve the issue through the available internal channels, report to the applicable federal or state entity.

The document also includes links to a number of resources on compliance; fraud and abuse prevention, detection and reporting; national reporting hotlines; and association information.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2016
Volume 21, Issue 11