Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association Website: gsa.memberclicks.net Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheGeorgiaSpeechLanguageHearingAssociation Instagram: @gshaorg Twitter: @GSHAorg Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/gshaorg/ Established: 1961 Members: 469 Contact: Jill Barton, jillslp@bellsouth.net, 470-259-0786 The Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association is a professional association for people specializing in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human communication disorders. We are dedicated to advocating for the professional interests ... State Spotlight
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State Spotlight  |   October 01, 2016
Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association
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Hearing & Speech Perception / State Spotlight
State Spotlight   |   October 01, 2016
Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The ASHA Leader, October 2016, Vol. 21, 66. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.21102016.66
The ASHA Leader, October 2016, Vol. 21, 66. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.21102016.66
Instagram: @gshaorg
Twitter: @GSHAorg
Established: 1961
Members: 469
Contact: Jill Barton, jillslp@bellsouth.net, 470-259-0786
How are you making a difference in your members’ professional lives?
The Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association is a professional association for people specializing in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human communication disorders. We are dedicated to advocating for the professional interests of our members and the people they serve, and providing a forum for the exchange of professional information and ideas.
What is the most significant challenge, unique circumstance or pressing frustration facing communication sciences and disorders professionals in Georgia today?
Working with other state associations across the nation, there seems to be a common underlying theme to the struggles that each association faces: membership recruitment and retention, positive advocacy outcomes, and the provision of high-quality continuing education. GSHA was successful in advocating to protect speech-language pathologists’ scope of practice from the music therapists’ scope of practice, eliminating the proposed inclusion of “diagnosis and treatment of language disorders.” However, we were defeated in our efforts to allow clinical fellows to bill Medicaid in all settings, not just schools. Drawing attendees to our annual convention for high-quality continuing education is a challenge because of competition from lower-cost online and other providers; we are constantly asking how we can enhance our offerings and reach a younger generation of members.
What is your association’s proudest accomplishment?
In the past five years, the GSHA has achieved much: The past four presidents participated in and completed ASHA’s Leadership Development Program; we successfully defended SLPs’ scope of practice from encroachment by music therapists; and we created a membership benefit, the Supervisor Interest Network Group (SING), which bridges academic and clinical supervisors for a continuum standard of supervision across settings.
What is a particularly memorable event in your association’s history and how did it come about?
Some of the most memorable moments for me as GSHA president took place while working this year with National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) groups across the state. Our NSSLHA groups volunteered to learn about advocacy during “The Day at the Capitol”; participated in an autism resource fair with GSHA Executive Board members to promote GSHA; raised phenomenal amounts of money for local charities by sponsoring walking teams, sponsoring 5K runs, and participating in other organization runs; and volunteered at the GSHA state conference.
Do you have a particularly successful advocacy or recruitment strategy to share?
We have implemented periodic after-hours socials, “Dining Out with GSHA.” These events are hosted by an Executive Board member in a nearby location. We use social media, email blasts and other methods to invite all members, who are encouraged to invite nonmembers. We also encourage student participation. These dining-outs are meant to be not only social events, but also networking opportunities. Board members are encouraged to recruit committee members, and attendees may recruit potential employees. There are a lot of business-card exchanges!
What should every communication sciences and disorders professional in Georgia know about the association?
GSHA truly represents the interests of all audiologists and SLPs in all work settings. We strive to continue to move forward to meet the needs of our younger members while maintaining the traditions that have made GSHA great.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2016
Volume 21, Issue 10