Some Young Adults Appear Unaware of Their Own Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Some college students and recent graduates may not realize they have noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), according to new research from Lehman College of the City University of New York. Although study participants indicated on an initial survey that they did not have a hearing loss, half of them were found ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2016
Some Young Adults Appear Unaware of Their Own Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2016
Some Young Adults Appear Unaware of Their Own Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, September 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21092016.np
The ASHA Leader, September 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21092016.np
Some college students and recent graduates may not realize they have noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), according to new research from Lehman College of the City University of New York.
Although study participants indicated on an initial survey that they did not have a hearing loss, half of them were found to have some degree of hearing loss when tested. Christine Rota-Donahue, director of the Auditory Perception Laboratory at Lehman and an assistant professor at the school’s Department of Speech-Language Hearing Sciences, and Sandra Levey, also a professor in the department, conducted the study, which appears in Hearing Journal.
Young people are at risk for NIHL from listening to music through headphones at dangerously high levels, the authors note.
Forty participants (27 female, 13 male) with an average age of 26 answered a questionnaire about noise exposure and their music-listening habits. No participants indicated that they had an existing hearing problem, but the researchers, through audiometric tests, found that 20 did, indeed, have hearing problems.
“Participants with a hearing problem listened longer and louder [to portable music devices] than participants with no hearing problem,” the authors write, adding that the results indicate “the need for broader education on the importance of hearing conservation through noise awareness campaigns and hearing screenings in college campuses.”
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September 2016
Volume 21, Issue 9