Sounds Like a Hit! Incorporating an occasional game into articulation practice keeps my students engaged and eager to come to treatment, and sports-themed activities are some of their favorites. To set up this baseball activity, students place an articulation card by each infielder and outfielder while practicing the words on the cards. The ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   September 01, 2016
Sounds Like a Hit!
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Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   September 01, 2016
Sounds Like a Hit!
The ASHA Leader, September 2016, Vol. 21, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.21092016.6
The ASHA Leader, September 2016, Vol. 21, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.21092016.6
Incorporating an occasional game into articulation practice keeps my students engaged and eager to come to treatment, and sports-themed activities are some of their favorites. To set up this baseball activity, students place an articulation card by each infielder and outfielder while practicing the words on the cards. The red team takes articulation cards from a pile to “pitch” target words to blue team batters. The blue batter picks a card from the pile and practices their target: Incorrect production of the target is a strike; a successful production is a hit to her choice of fielder. Then the defense needs to produce the target on the card near that fielder: Correct production by the red team is an out; an incorrect production is a base hit for the blue team. Traditional baseball rules apply: three strikes for an out, three outs for the inning. The game works best when all team members are working on the same sound, but it can be tweaked for students working on different targets.
About me:
I am a bilingual speech-language pathologist with master’s degrees in linguistics and communication disorders. For the past four years, I have worked in a school district just outside Chicago where more than half of the students speak Spanish as their first language. I am in the middle of a move to Phoenix, where I hope to continue working with Spanish-speaking clients.
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September 2016
Volume 21, Issue 9