National Academy of Sciences Recommends Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends creating a new class of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing devices, according to its recently released report on accessibility and affordability of hearing health care. “Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability” recommends the Food and Drug Administration make OTC hearing ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2016
National Academy of Sciences Recommends Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices
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Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2016
National Academy of Sciences Recommends Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21082016.12
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21082016.12
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends creating a new class of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing devices, according to its recently released report on accessibility and affordability of hearing health care.
Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability” recommends the Food and Drug Administration make OTC hearing devices available for people with mild-to-moderate hearing loss; however, it does not include a recommendation that consumers receive an audiologic evaluation before using the devices.
“Although ASHA supports greater access to technology, we continue to maintain that counseling and aural rehabilitation—provided by audiologists—are critical to the successful adaptation of technology,” says Neil DiSarno, ASHA chief staff officer for audiology, in an ASHA announcement on the NAS report.
ASHA supports some of the other 11 recommendations in the NAS report—which covers a spectrum of other hearing health concerns, such as research, insurance, regulatory guidelines and consumer advocacy—including suggestions about Medicare coverage of audiologic services in line with H.R. 1116, the Medicare Audiology Services Enhancement Act of 2015. ASHA also agrees with the need for a demonstration project to evaluate the health effects of allowing Medicare beneficiaries direct access to hearing-related diagnostic services, rather than requiring them to obtain a physician’s referral.
The report also identifies hearing loss as a medical condition and the fifth leading cause of years lived with a disability.
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August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8