Training Program for Adults With ASD Matches Skills, Potential A new program at a California community college capitalizes on the unique abilities of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), training them to work on computer-numerical-control machines (CNC) in manufacturing industries. In a partnership between Glendale Community College and the Uniquely Abled Academy, highly functioning people with ASD who have ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2016
Training Program for Adults With ASD Matches Skills, Potential
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2016
Training Program for Adults With ASD Matches Skills, Potential
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.21082016.10
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.21082016.10
A new program at a California community college capitalizes on the unique abilities of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), training them to work on computer-numerical-control machines (CNC) in manufacturing industries.
In a partnership between Glendale Community College and the Uniquely Abled Academy, highly functioning people with ASD who have a high school diploma or GED enroll in a 10-week program that combines in-class instruction on CNC machinery with additional lab work, site visits and job-readiness preparation.
Operating the machinery—which converts manufacturing designs into numbers that control the movement of a cutter—requires highly focused and repetitive work, a good match for some people with ASD. Graduates will qualify for entry-level positions, including machine trainee, machinist apprentice, CNC operator and CNC programmer, with a median salary of about $18 an hour.
Glendale Community College operates many manufacturing training programs, with state-of-the-art machines and certificate programs addressing the demand for manufacturing programs. The Uniquely Abled Academy partners with machine technology educators, specialists in education for people with ASD, state and local social service agencies and other organizations to train and employ people with ASD in the manufacturing industry, where many jobs require the unique skills of many people with ASD.
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August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8