Maximizing Communication We applaud Tammy Hopper for the excellent article “Not Cured … But Improved” (June 2016), which spotlights the important role that speech-language pathologists play in providing conversational and memory support to maximize the functioning of clients with Alzheimer’s dementia. The Mercy College graduate program in Dobbs Ferry, New York, includes ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   August 01, 2016
Maximizing Communication
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Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Inbox
Inbox   |   August 01, 2016
Maximizing Communication
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.21082016.4
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.21082016.4
We applaud Tammy Hopper for the excellent article “Not Cured … But Improved” (June 2016), which spotlights the important role that speech-language pathologists play in providing conversational and memory support to maximize the functioning of clients with Alzheimer’s dementia.
The Mercy College graduate program in Dobbs Ferry, New York, includes in its clinical education a semester-long, hands-on experience in which students facilitate oral communication groups for participants with dementia in private residential facilities in Westchester County. The students employ written and graphic cues, reminiscence and validation therapies, and sensory and Montessori-based activities during weekly one-hour sessions. Our 2013 Perspectives article, “Oral Discussion Groups for Senior Citizens: A Community-Service Model”, provides detailed information about the benefits of applying different therapy models and techniques to engage and facilitate interactions among participants, underscoring Dr. Hopper’s message about maximizing communication for this population.
Christine Kosky and Gloria Schlisselberg, Dobbs Ferry, New York

Thank you for sharing how your graduate students learn a variety of approaches to supporting communication in people with dementia.

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August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8