Leadership and Discourse in Philly The 2016 convention champions the leader in all of us and encourages lively discussion of major issues. From the President
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From the President  |   August 01, 2016
Leadership and Discourse in Philly
Author Notes
  • Jaynee A. Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, is director of pediatric audiology at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery in the University of Michigan Health System. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 8, Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance; 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood; and 11, Administration and Supervision. jaynee@med.umich.edu
    Jaynee A. Handelsman, PhD, CCC-A, is director of pediatric audiology at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery in the University of Michigan Health System. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 8, Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance; 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood; and 11, Administration and Supervision. jaynee@med.umich.edu×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / From the President
From the President   |   August 01, 2016
Leadership and Discourse in Philly
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.FTP.21082016.6
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.FTP.21082016.6
I am really excited about the theme for this year’s ASHA Convention: “Everyday leadership. Leadership every day.” Too often we think leadership applies only to certain people fulfilling particular roles, and that construct puts leadership in the hands of very few and beyond the reach of many. Yet each of us affects others and has influence, whether or not we have a title or role that others would recognize as embodying leadership.
To me, everyday leadership refers to things that we do on a daily basis that affect those around us, in some cases without our realization. We are fortunate to have organizational consultant Drew Dudley joining us at the convention as the keynote speaker for the opening session—an interview with him appears in this issue. The “lollipop story” he tells in his TED Talk is a great example of a person having a profound impact on the course of someone else’s life without knowing that to be the case. I look forward to hearing what he has to say about everyday leadership.
As audiologists and speech-language pathologists, we are used to thinking about how our professional skills improve the lives of the clients and families we serve. As educators, we likely think about our ability to increase the knowledge and skills of the students we teach. As administrators, we make decisions on a regular basis that shape the course of the programs we oversee.
Those are all examples of leadership and they happen every day, but when I think about everyday leadership, I think about how a word, a smile or a gesture might be precisely what someone needs that day in order to move forward. I think about letting a colleague know that you believe in them and are there to support them through a tough journey.
Everyday leadership means being fully present and willing to reach out to those around us. It might mean taking time to be with a friend during a health crisis or holding a person’s hand when he or she is afraid. It might just mean taking time to listen. And it might mean handing out a lollipop to an incoming freshman, easing the anxiety of someone who had wanted to quit and go home.
This issue of the Leader is intended to help you get ready for the 2016 ASHA Convention in Philadelphia. The co-chairs have planned lots of exciting sessions and events, including a series of classic debates that seek to bring back “old-school” healthy discourse. This year, audiology topics are organized in several mini-series that include sessions about hearing, balance and tinnitus for adults and children, as well as hearing and balance science.
Look for more information from co-chairs A. Tucker Gleason and Michael J. Flahive. Another exciting addition this year is the opportunity for you to tell your story through “Humans of ASHA,” modeled after “Humans of New York.” I encourage each of you to be a part of the ASHA story.
I know that convention can feel incredibly huge and overwhelming because there are so many amazing sessions, exhibit hall features and fun things to do in Philly. Really, it’s a series of individual classes and opportunities that can add up to an amazing experience. I encourage you to first select one session and then set your course in small attainable steps. Try to include plenty of time to network with colleagues and introduce yourself to at least one new person. We are all part of the ASHA family; convention is both a reunion and a time to make new connections. I hope to see you in Philly!
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FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8