Students and Professionals: Enroll in Mentoring Program Students looking for help with a specific short- or long-term goal and communication sciences and disorders (CSD) professionals willing to provide guidance can apply to ASHA’s Student to Empowered Professional (STEP) mentoring program. This online mentoring program connects students with experienced mentors based on common professional interests, such as work ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   August 01, 2016
Students and Professionals: Enroll in Mentoring Program
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2016
Students and Professionals: Enroll in Mentoring Program
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 74. doi:10.1044/leader.AN5.21082016.74
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 74. doi:10.1044/leader.AN5.21082016.74
Students looking for help with a specific short- or long-term goal and communication sciences and disorders (CSD) professionals willing to provide guidance can apply to ASHA’s Student to Empowered Professional (STEP) mentoring program.
This online mentoring program connects students with experienced mentors based on common professional interests, such as work setting, target population or work goals.
Any CSD student is eligible to apply, with preference given to those from racial or ethnic backgrounds historically underrepresented in the CSD professions.
Membership in the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association gives students access to all STEP resources.
Any ASHA member with at least three years of professional experience who is willing to commit time, serve as a resource or adviser, and assist a student with challenges can serve as a mentor.
For example, Maya Edinburgh, a graduate student at the University of the District of Columbia, wanted guidance on specializing in cleft palate and craniofacial anomalies. She was paired with Anne Bedwinek, adjunct associate professor in the University of Missouri’s CSD department.
“Dr. Bedwinek’s knowledge of and passion for cleft palate and craniofacial anomalies, as well as the overall field of speech-language pathology, helped me to develop a vision,” Edinburgh says. “She gave me an immense amount of background information on the specialty, and a plethora of information on clinical fellowships, observation opportunities and continuing education options. My master’s thesis will be on current training and continuous education for preschool and school-based SLPs, a topic Dr. Bedwinek has researched. She will serve as an adviser on my thesis committee.”
Bedwinek found Edinburgh to be “a top student, eager to learn and articulate, who always followed up on our discussions.” As a mentor, Bedwinek had two rules: “Academic and clinical obligations always came first before STEP communication,” she says. “Number two, I was a consultant, and her professors and advisers always had precedence over anything I advised.”
Edinburgh encourages other students to enroll. “Joining the STEP program has been a tremendous asset in my future,” she says. “It allowed me to meet an influential professional with whom I share the same passion, and provided me with important information on becoming a member of a cleft-craniofacial team.”
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August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8