Academic-Research Career Mentorship Enrollment Opens Aug. 4 Doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty in communication sciences and disorders can be matched with a hand-picked professional mentor through ASHA’s Mentoring for Academic-Research Careers (MARC) program. The MARC application period is open Aug. 4–Sept. 7. This online mentoring program matches protégés and mentors based on common academic and ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   August 01, 2016
Academic-Research Career Mentorship Enrollment Opens Aug. 4
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2016
Academic-Research Career Mentorship Enrollment Opens Aug. 4
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 73. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.21082016.73
The ASHA Leader, August 2016, Vol. 21, 73. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.21082016.73
Doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty in communication sciences and disorders can be matched with a hand-picked professional mentor through ASHA’s Mentoring for Academic-Research Careers (MARC) program.
This online mentoring program matches protégés and mentors based on common academic and professional goals. Successful mentorships can direct protégés in the right direction and often create opportunities that otherwise might not be attainable.
A few guidelines for potential protégés can help yield a successful MARC experience.
Hone your goals
Think carefully about the goals listed on the application. The program matches participants based on the identified mentoring needs of the accepted applicants and the available mentors. Applicants should list only the three or four academic or professional goals that are most relevant and important over the next few years.
A junior faculty member interested in developing a teaching portfolio, for example, might be matched with a mentor experienced in teaching and mentoring professors in the scholarship of teaching and learning.
Communicate early
It’s best to hit the ground running. Protégés who begin communicating early (and regularly) with their mentors are more likely to realize at least one of their goals. Establishing a regular contact schedule ensures consistent communication.
In addition to sending emails, pairs often choose to videoconference, speak on the phone or meet up at a conference that both plan to attend.
Keep it going
MARC relationships don’t have to come to an end after the nine-month mentoring cycle. Many MARC mentor-protégé pairs from several years ago continue to communicate through email, at conventions and in other ways.
MARC encourages protégés to volunteer as MARC mentors. Some of the program’s most effective mentors were—or are—MARC protégés. For example, many of the program’s junior faculty participants provide mentorship services to PhD students, while simultaneously being mentored by senior faculty mentors.
For more information, contact marc@asha.org.
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August 2016
Volume 21, Issue 8