Noise Hampers Children’s Expressive Word Learning Noise limits expressive vocabulary growth in children and reduces the quality of word form representation in the lexicon, according to research published in the July 2012 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. The results imply that clear speech input can aid expressive vocabulary growth in children, even ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2013
Noise Hampers Children’s Expressive Word Learning
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Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2013
Noise Hampers Children’s Expressive Word Learning
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.18052013.33
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.18052013.33
Noise limits expressive vocabulary growth in children and reduces the quality of word form representation in the lexicon, according to research published in the July 2012 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. The results imply that clear speech input can aid expressive vocabulary growth in children, even in noisy environments.
Researchers sought to determine the effects of noise and speech style on word learning in typically developing school-age children. Thirty-one participants age 9–11 attempted to learn two sets of eight novel words and their referents. They heard each word 13 times within meaningful narrative discourse. The authors manipulated signal-to-noise ratio (noise vs. quiet) and speech style (plain vs. clear) so that half the children heard the new words in broadband white noise and half heard them in quiet. Within those conditions, each child heard one set of words produced in a plain speech style and another set in a clear speech style.
Children trained in quiet learned to produce the word forms more accurately than those who were trained in noise. Clear speech resulted in more accurate word form productions than plain speech, whether the children had learned in noise or quiet. Learning from clear speech in noise and plain speech in quiet produced comparable results.
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May 2013
Volume 18, Issue 5