Usability Testing Shows Flaws in Hearing Aid Instructions Some hearing aid instruction booklets contain information that users may find difficult to locate, understand and follow, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. These limitations may negatively affect hearing aid satisfaction and use. The study examined whether people could use two ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2013
Usability Testing Shows Flaws in Hearing Aid Instructions
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Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2013
Usability Testing Shows Flaws in Hearing Aid Instructions
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.18052013.32
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.18052013.32
Some hearing aid instruction booklets contain information that users may find difficult to locate, understand and follow, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. These limitations may negatively affect hearing aid satisfaction and use.
The study examined whether people could use two hearing aid instruction booklets to carry out basic maintenance tasks and to find and understand key facts. Using a cross-sectional study design, researchers recruited 40 participants (25 women and 15 men, age 46–72 years) with no experience of hearing aids or audiology services to test instruction booklets for either a Danalogic or a Unitron hearing aid (20 participants each). Researchers asked participants to follow the instructions provided in the booklets to complete common tasks—for example, cleaning the hearing aid and mold, and changing the battery—and demonstrate understanding of information. Then a short individual interview captured participants’ views of the booklets.
Participants experienced problems in completing all tasks while following instructions provided by both booklets. Individual interviews highlighted further issues regarding layout, diagrams and content, including missing information. Researchers recommend that written information for clients be evaluated prior to use. This study supports the premise that performance-based usability and literature testing are appropriate methods.
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May 2013
Volume 18, Issue 5