Resource in Illinois “Refocusing on Choices” in the May 2016 Leader was a well-written article about a very important topic related to working with young children with hearing impairments. I couldn’t help but pause, however, on the quote from audiologist Lisa Satterfield about geography playing a significant role in the options available for ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   July 01, 2016
Resource in Illinois
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Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Inbox
Inbox   |   July 01, 2016
Resource in Illinois
The ASHA Leader, July 2016, Vol. 21, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.21072016.5
The ASHA Leader, July 2016, Vol. 21, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.21072016.5
Refocusing on Choices” in the May 2016 Leader was a well-written article about a very important topic related to working with young children with hearing impairments. I couldn’t help but pause, however, on the quote from audiologist Lisa Satterfield about geography playing a significant role in the options available for families. Satterfield used central Illinois in her example as a location where teachers of the deaf and speech-language pathologists fluent in sign language might be scarce. While I understand this was a hypothetical example, I would like to point out that the Illinois School for the Deaf is in centrally located Jacksonville, just west of the capital city of Springfield.
Deaf and hard-of-hearing students from all over the state attend this residential school, receiving academic instruction in American Sign Language, cued English and simultaneous communication. There are four ASHA-certified SLPs on staff who are fluent in sign language and provide services to all students. The school and deaf community in the area also provide a wealth of opportunities, information, and resources for students and families, including deaf adult role models, sign language classes, summer camps and more.
I very much appreciated the article and Satterfield’s input. I feel that educating our families about their communication options is of utmost importance. There is nothing more crucial when dealing with students who are deaf and hard of hearing.
Christine Hall, Jacksonville, Illinois

The Leader is happy to acknowledge the efforts of your school and the many other schools that specialize in the needs of children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

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July 2016
Volume 21, Issue 7