Turn Down the Volume at Conventions I read “Music to Their Ears” with interest. Loud music can damage hearing. Why is it then, that prior to the Awards of the Association ceremony and parties/mixers at the ASHA convention and at my state affiliate, the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the music is extremely loud—to a level that I ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   July 01, 2016
Turn Down the Volume at Conventions
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   July 01, 2016
Turn Down the Volume at Conventions
The ASHA Leader, July 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.21072016.4
The ASHA Leader, July 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.21072016.4
I read “Music to Their Ears” with interest. Loud music can damage hearing. Why is it then, that prior to the Awards of the Association ceremony and parties/mixers at the ASHA convention and at my state affiliate, the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the music is extremely loud—to a level that I would consider “deafening”?
As a speech-language pathologist with a significant hearing loss, I struggle to hear well in my job, even with my hearing aids. I cannot afford to lose any more of my hearing. I therefore have to purposefully exclude myself from many events at the ASHA and CSHA conventions.
I find it difficult to understand why neither ASHA nor CSHA are leaders in the support of hearing conservation at their conventions, to the detriment of their members’ hearing and seemingly quite hypocritical. Time to practice what you preach, ASHA and CSHA—way past time.
Pamela Greenhalgh, Fullerton, California

Thank you for your input. ASHA actively promotes hearing conservation and applies safe hearing practices at meetings. Sound levels are monitored at major events, but individual responses to different sound levels are influenced by many variables. Although ASHA often participates in planning for social events, sound levels at those activities are partially controlled by others (engineers and musicians, for example). ASHA has offered earplugs at our own social events.

1 Comment
July 5, 2016
Diane Taylor
"Time for ASHA to practice what you preach"
Earplugs? That's the answer? We should be modeling for our patients and the public. Turn down the volume! It's not only bad for the hearing, it's also bad for the voice. SLP's, you should be speaking up, too. (pardon the pun)
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July 2016
Volume 21, Issue 7