Nutritional Supplements May Help Slow Hearing Loss in Mice A regimen of antioxidants could slow hearing loss in mice that have a specific gene mutation—the same mutation that is a prominent cause of hearing loss in humans, according to research from the University of Michigan’s Kresge Hearing Research Institute. A diet enhanced with nutritional supplements including beta carotene, magnesium ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   June 01, 2016
Nutritional Supplements May Help Slow Hearing Loss in Mice
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Hearing Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   June 01, 2016
Nutritional Supplements May Help Slow Hearing Loss in Mice
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21062016.16
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21062016.16
A regimen of antioxidants could slow hearing loss in mice that have a specific gene mutation—the same mutation that is a prominent cause of hearing loss in humans, according to research from the University of Michigan’s Kresge Hearing Research Institute.
A diet enhanced with nutritional supplements including beta carotene, magnesium and vitamins C and E slowed hereditary hearing loss in mice who had a connexin 26 gene deletion, according to the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports. However, the researchers also found that the same diet accelerated hearing loss in mice with a different mutation, AUNA1, which causes a rare type of hearing loss.
“Our findings suggest that a particular high dose of mineral and vitamin supplements may be beneficial to one genetic mutation,” says senior author Yehoash Raphael, professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. “However, the negative outcome in the AUNA1 mouse model suggests that different mutations may respond to the special diet in different ways.”
In different experiments, researchers delivered the micronutrient formula to the mice postnatally and in utero. In addition to experiencing a slowing progression of hearing loss, some mice with the connexin 26 mutation also showed slight improvement in hearing threshold.
The results are “encouraging” for those who treat children with the connexin 26 gene mutation, the authors note.
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June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6