Kindergarteners’ Behavior, Social ‘Readiness’ Could Affect Long-Term Success When kindergartners step into their classroom on the first day of school, their level of social-behavioral development at that time could be linked to their future academic performance through fourth grade, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. In tracking more than 9,000 Baltimore City Public ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   June 01, 2016
Kindergarteners’ Behavior, Social ‘Readiness’ Could Affect Long-Term Success
Author Notes
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   June 01, 2016
Kindergarteners’ Behavior, Social ‘Readiness’ Could Affect Long-Term Success
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.21062016.16
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.21062016.16
When kindergartners step into their classroom on the first day of school, their level of social-behavioral development at that time could be linked to their future academic performance through fourth grade, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing.
In tracking more than 9,000 Baltimore City Public School students, nursing professor Deborah Gross and her team found that kindergartners not considered socially or behaviorally “ready” for school were up to 80 percent more likely to be held back a grade, as well as up to 80 percent more likely to have an IEP or 504 Plan. The study authors worked in collaboration with the Baltimore Education Research Consortium.
Children deemed “not ready” (who were more likely to be boys than girls) were also up to seven times more likely than their “ready” peers to be suspended or expelled at least once.

Kindergartners not considered socially or behaviorally “ready” for school were up to 80 percent more likely to be held back a grade, as well as up to 80 percent more likely to have an IEP or 504 Plan.

“These results are important,” says Gross, professor and the Leonard and Helen Stulman Endowed Chair in Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing. “They show how critical social and behavioral skills are for learning, how early the struggle begins for young children, and how important it is to address the problem of social-behavioral readiness well before children enter kindergarten.”
Gross says kindergarten teachers in the study rated more than half of their students as “not ready” socially and behaviorally for school. The study notes the strain and long-term effects the results put on communities, families, schools and budgets.
Development can be hindered by chronic stress, poverty or traumatic experiences, which the authors hope to combat by recommending schools and cities develop strategies for early childhood learning, while ramping up support for faculty and parents.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6