60 Percent of Childhood Hearing Loss Is Preventable About 60 percent of childhood hearing loss could be prevented, according to a report issued by The World Health Organization (WHO) on the current status of childhood hearing loss, the causes and impact of hearing loss, and strategies for prevention and care. The report indicates that 360 million people—5 percent ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2016
60 Percent of Childhood Hearing Loss Is Preventable
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2016
60 Percent of Childhood Hearing Loss Is Preventable
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.21062016.12
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.21062016.12
About 60 percent of childhood hearing loss could be prevented, according to a report issued by The World Health Organization (WHO) on the current status of childhood hearing loss, the causes and impact of hearing loss, and strategies for prevention and care.
The report indicates that 360 million people—5 percent of the world’s population—live with hearing loss that is considered disabling. Nearly 10 percent of these are children mainly living in low- and middle-income countries. The report estimates that 40 percent of cases are associated with genetic causes.
The remaining 60 percent of cases are associated with infections such as measles, mumps, rubella and meningitis; complications at birth; and the use of ototoxic medication in expecting mothers and newborns. WHO believes that preventive measures—immunization and good hygiene practices, improved maternal and child health practices, and ototoxic drug avoidance—could reduce childhood hearing loss.
In addition to outlining the causes of and ways to prevent hearing loss, the report details the impact of unaddressed hearing loss and the importance of early identification and intervention. It also includes vignettes from seven countries—Cambodia, Canada, Thailand, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States and Vietnam—that illustrate various initiatives for children with hearing loss.
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June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6