Childhood Disability Prevalence Exceeds 1 in 7 More than one in seven American children have a mental, behavioral or developmental disorder, with prevalence varying widely across the country, according the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 21 percent of children in Arkansas and Kentucky have one of the three conditions—compared with the 15.4 percent ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2016
Childhood Disability Prevalence Exceeds 1 in 7
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Special Populations / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2016
Childhood Disability Prevalence Exceeds 1 in 7
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21062016.12
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21062016.12
More than one in seven American children have a mental, behavioral or developmental disorder, with prevalence varying widely across the country, according the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
More than 21 percent of children in Arkansas and Kentucky have one of the three conditions—compared with the 15.4 percent national figure. California reports the lowest rate in the nation—10.6 percent.
The findings are based on information collected on more than 35,000 children, ages 2 to 8, in the 2011–2012 National Survey of Children’s Health. The report documents significant associations of early childhood mental, behavior and development disorders with sociodemographic, health care, family and community factors.
Factors strongly associated with a higher risk for difficulties include the parents’ mental health, ability to live on the family income, child care, and access to a medical home, according to the report.
The report indicates that the findings have important public health implications. “These data support the Institute of Medicine recommendation that resources directed toward improving health care and supporting families and communities are needed to prevent mental, emotional and behavioral disorders, and promote healthy development among all young children,” it states.
“Such investments would require substantial collaboration across public health, pediatric and other agencies responsible for providing services to children, but could yield widespread benefits for early childhood and lifelong health.”
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June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6