‘Life, Animated’ Hits Theaters in July “Life, Animated,” a documentary film about a boy with autism spectrum disorder who found a pathway to language through Disney animation, will be released July 1 in Los Angeles and New York. Based on the book “Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism” by the boy’s father, Pulitzer ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2016
‘Life, Animated’ Hits Theaters in July
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2016
‘Life, Animated’ Hits Theaters in July
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21062016.10
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21062016.10
“Life, Animated,” a documentary film about a boy with autism spectrum disorder who found a pathway to language through Disney animation, will be released July 1 in Los Angeles and New York.
Based on the book “Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism” by the boy’s father, Pulitzer Prize-winner Ron Suskind, the film won the 2016 Sundance Film Festival U.S. documentary directing award.
The book describes how Owen, who stopped speaking at 3, memorized dozens of Disney movies, finding in them a pathway to language and a framework for making sense of the world. The family was forced to become animated characters, communicating with Owen in Disney dialogue and song.
The book has coined and spurred research on “affinity therapy”—leveraging an individual’s core affinities to tap into brain reward circuitry supporting social motivation and social learning.
Scientists at MIT, Yale and the University of Cambridge are investigating whether tapping into a person’s obsessions or preoccupations can be systematically developed as a treatment, if the treatment is beneficial, and the neural mechanism of any benefit. Results of the cognitive-neuroscience studies could inform the development of an empirically validated, affinity-based, cognitive-behavioral treatment for the core social communication deficits of autism.
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June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6