Ice, Ice Baby As a pediatric speech-language pathologist, I am constantly looking for new and dynamic ways to explain a new concept to kids. Sometimes you can find therapy material in things you use in your everyday routines—such as ice cube trays and reusable ice cubes. These items are easy to find ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   June 01, 2016
Ice, Ice Baby
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Early Identification & Intervention / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   June 01, 2016
Ice, Ice Baby
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.21062016.8
The ASHA Leader, June 2016, Vol. 21, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.21062016.8
As a pediatric speech-language pathologist, I am constantly looking for new and dynamic ways to explain a new concept to kids. Sometimes you can find therapy material in things you use in your everyday routines—such as ice cube trays and reusable ice cubes. These items are easy to find and very economical.
I use these materials to help older kids understand concepts such as color matching, color sorting and color sequencing. They love to work with reusable ice cubes because they contain water. For younger children, you can use the ice cubes for color naming and counting.
About me:
I am a bilingual SLP and have lived in Puerto Rico all my life. I work in an interdisciplinary private practice with Spanish-speaking children from 2 to 22 years old. After finishing my master’s in speech-language pathology, I completed a graduate certificate in developmental disabilities and early intervention, all at the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus. I’ve been working for five years as a pediatric SLP.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
June 2016
Volume 21, Issue 6