Silo Buster Three: The New Face(s) of Training at MUSC The Medical University of South Carolina is a leader in providing interprofessional education and training. Here’s a snapshot of its IPE program. Features
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Features  |   June 01, 2013
Silo Buster Three: The New Face(s) of Training at MUSC
Author Notes
  • Amy Blue, PhD, assistant provost for education and professor of family medicine, Medical University of South Carolina. pickerij@mail.strose.edu
    Amy Blue, PhD, assistant provost for education and professor of family medicine, Medical University of South Carolina. pickerij@mail.strose.edu×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Features
Features   |   June 01, 2013
Silo Buster Three: The New Face(s) of Training at MUSC
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 45. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1sb3.18062013.45
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 45. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1sb3.18062013.45
At the Medical University of South Carolina, we’ve required students to participate in interprofessional education since 2007—when we focused on IPE as part of university-wide reaccreditation. All first- and second- year students participate in an Interprofessional Day, where they learn more about the necessity and value of interprofessional collaboration.
First-year students learn more about one another’s professions through an interactive small-group exercise. The second-year experience builds on that experience through discussion of cases designed to showcase the value of collaboration. Students also complete an interprofessional course, in which they learn about the complexities of the health care system—including cultural and ethical issues—and work in small interprofessional groups to analyze a fictional sentinel event. The intent is that they apply teamwork skills when working together.
Because problems can emerge when bringing together different professionals and personalities, we incorporate training on effective teamwork behaviors when encountering challenges: respect for others, listening to different perspectives, clear communication, encouraging others to participate, negotiating differences to be inclusive, and resolving conflict productively. Interprofessional challenges typically relate to respect issues, a need to break down the traditional hierarchy in medicine, and confidence in reaching out to other professions—a trait that is often not role-modeled by faculty or preceptors. We sensitize our students to all of this.
As students progress to clinical rotations, each program requires them to purposefully interact with other professions to improve a patient’s care—not simply stand side by side during patient rounds and never interact. Our goal is for students to apply teamwork skills and their knowledge of others’ professions in multiple learning and practice settings before they graduate. Students report confidence in seeking help from other professionals during patient care. Ensuring that students can collaborate and truly understand what different professions contribute to health care is the new direction in health professions education.
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June 2013
Volume 18, Issue 6