Do Sentence Length and Syntactic Complexity Influence Speech Motor Control? Some children who stutter exhibit more variable speech motor coordination during fluent speech production than typically developing children, according to a study in the February 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. Sentence length and complexity did not disproportionately affect the coordination variability and duration of ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2013
Do Sentence Length and Syntactic Complexity Influence Speech Motor Control?
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Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2013
Do Sentence Length and Syntactic Complexity Influence Speech Motor Control?
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33-34. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18072013.33
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33-34. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18072013.33
Some children who stutter exhibit more variable speech motor coordination during fluent speech production than typically developing children, according to a study in the February 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. Sentence length and complexity did not disproportionately affect the coordination variability and duration of children who stutter, but the authors observed considerable individual differences in performance.
To investigate the potential effects of increased sentence length and syntactic complexity on the speech motor control of children who stutter, researchers had participants repeat sentences of varied length and syntactic complexity. Then they analyzed kinematic measures of articulatory coordination variability and movement duration during perceptually fluent speech for 16 children who stutter and 16 typically developing children ages 4–6. The authors also examined behavioral data from a larger pool of children.
For both groups, articulatory coordination variability increased with sentence length, and movement duration was greater for syntactically complex—as opposed to simple—sentences. For sentences with simple syntax, the children who stuttered had higher coordination variability than typically developing peers. There was no group difference in coordination variability for complex sentences. But coordination variability increased significantly with complexity for typically developing children, whereas that of children who stutter remained at the high level they also demonstrated for simple sentences. Overall, the children who stuttered tended toward higher coordination variability compared with the typically developing children.
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July 2013
Volume 18, Issue 7