3 for Me! On Speech Room News, Jenna Rayburn offers a way to encourage children to use their hard-won articulation gains. “Articulation carryover has to be one of the most difficult skills we teach during speech and language intervention,” she says. “Start your next session by giving each of your students three magical ... Blogjam
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Blogjam  |   July 01, 2013
3 for Me!
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Blogjam
Blogjam   |   July 01, 2013
3 for Me!
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ4.18072013.12
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ4.18072013.12
On Speech Room News, Jenna Rayburn offers a way to encourage children to use their hard-won articulation gains. “Articulation carryover has to be one of the most difficult skills we teach during speech and language intervention,” she says. “Start your next session by giving each of your students three magical gold coins. Really, three of anything will work (bingo chips, pictures, pennies, etc.). The goal is for the students to keep all of their coins across the session.” If a student working on /r/ sounds, for example, says a word with an /r/ produced incorrectly and doesn’t self-correct, Rayburn takes a coin.
“Of course, you could use this same idea to work on other skills. I’ve used it for pronoun carryover, so if a student makes an error in conversational speech with subjective and possessive pronouns, I take a coin.” For students just learning to work on carryover, she ups the allotment to five or six coins, because “You don’t want the student to run out of coins in the first five minutes!”
Students who have coins left at the end of the session earn rewards, and “If I got all their coins (three for me!) then they have an extra sheet of homework.”
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July 2013
Volume 18, Issue 7