Parent and Teacher Ratings Reveal Poor Executive Function in Children With SLI Parent and teacher perceptions of executive functioning in children with specific language impairment align with prior findings of executive function deficits documented on neuropsychological assessments and experimental tasks, according to a study in the May 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. The results provide additional evidence of ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2013
Parent and Teacher Ratings Reveal Poor Executive Function in Children With SLI
Author Notes
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2013
Parent and Teacher Ratings Reveal Poor Executive Function in Children With SLI
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18082013.36
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18082013.36
Parent and teacher perceptions of executive functioning in children with specific language impairment align with prior findings of executive function deficits documented on neuropsychological assessments and experimental tasks, according to a study in the May 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. The results provide additional evidence of the relationship between language abilities and executive functioning in early child development.
Researchers assessed 19 preschoolers with specific language impairment and 19 age- and gender-matched typically developing peers, using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Version, a rating scale designed to investigate executive behaviors in everyday activities. The participants’ parents and teachers also completed the BRIEF–P.
Parents and teachers rated the executive functioning of children with specific language impairment significantly worse than that of controls. Adults’ perceptions of the children’s executive functioning significantly correlated with the children’s language abilities.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2013
Volume 18, Issue 8