Children With Specific Language Impairment Vulnerable to Speech-Sound Competition A study in the April 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research replicates previous findings that children with specific language impairment name pictures more slowly than do chronological age-matched peers. But the results also suggest that children with specific language impairment are more vulnerable to increased ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2013
Children With Specific Language Impairment Vulnerable to Speech-Sound Competition
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Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2013
Children With Specific Language Impairment Vulnerable to Speech-Sound Competition
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18082013.36
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18082013.36
A study in the April 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research replicates previous findings that children with specific language impairment name pictures more slowly than do chronological age-matched peers. But the results also suggest that children with specific language impairment are more vulnerable to increased competition from words with frequent phonotactic patterns, which also come from dense phonological neighborhoods.
Rapid naming depends on two factors known to be problematic for children with SLI—lexical retrieval and nonlinguistic speed of processing. Although all studies implicate a speed-of-processing deficit as a contributing factor, researchers do not agree on the influence of language factors. The study aimed to explore word frequency and phonotactic pattern frequency as potential lexical factors contributing to the naming deficits experienced by children with SLI.
Researchers asked three groups of children—20 children with SLI (median age 9 years, 8 months), 20 younger controls, and 20 chronological age-matched peers—to name pictures whose labels varied by word and phonotactic pattern frequency. Reaction time results revealed significant main effects of group and word frequency. Effects due to word frequency were comparable for all groups, but a significant interaction between group and phonotactic pattern frequency revealed that phonotactic pattern frequency effects (that is, greater vulnerability to increased competition from high-frequency and high-density words) were greater for children with SLI than for vocabulary-matched children or chronological age-matched peers.
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August 2013
Volume 18, Issue 8