Classroom Phonological Awareness Instruction Improves Literacy Outcomes A short, intensive period of classroom phonological awareness instruction in the first year of school can raise the literacy profiles of children with and without spoken language difficulties, according to a study in the April 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Despite strong investment in raising ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2013
Classroom Phonological Awareness Instruction Improves Literacy Outcomes
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Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2013
Classroom Phonological Awareness Instruction Improves Literacy Outcomes
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.18082013.36
The ASHA Leader, August 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.18082013.36
A short, intensive period of classroom phonological awareness instruction in the first year of school can raise the literacy profiles of children with and without spoken language difficulties, according to a study in the April 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools.
Despite strong investment in raising literacy achievement for all children, significant inequalities in literacy persist in some of the world’s most advanced economies.
Researchers used a quasi-experimental design to measure the phonological awareness, reading and spelling development of 129 5-year-olds. Thirty-four children received 10 weeks of phonological awareness instruction from their classroom teachers. Ninety-five children continued with their usual reading program, which included phonics instruction but did not target phonological awareness.
Children who received phonological awareness instruction demonstrated superior literacy outcomes compared to children who followed the usual literacy curriculum. Children with spoken language impairment showed significant improvements in phonological awareness, reading and spelling, but had a different response pattern to instruction compared to children with typical language. Significantly, 6 percent of children who received phonological awareness instruction experienced word decoding difficulties at the end of the program, compared with 26 percent of the children who followed the usual literacy curriculum.
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August 2013
Volume 18, Issue 8