In Story Retelling, Children With Autism Show Qualitative Differences Facial and vocal expressions of people with high-functioning autism were as recognizable as those of their typically developing peers but were qualitatively different, according to a study published in the June 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. These preliminary data show qualitative differences in nonverbal ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   October 01, 2013
In Story Retelling, Children With Autism Show Qualitative Differences
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   October 01, 2013
In Story Retelling, Children With Autism Show Qualitative Differences
The ASHA Leader, October 2013, Vol. 18, 34-35. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18102013.34
The ASHA Leader, October 2013, Vol. 18, 34-35. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18102013.34
Facial and vocal expressions of people with high-functioning autism were as recognizable as those of their typically developing peers but were qualitatively different, according to a study published in the June 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. These preliminary data show qualitative differences in nonverbal communication that may have a significant, negative impact on the social communication success of children and adolescents with high-functioning autism.
People with high-functioning autism have qualitative differences in facial expression and prosody production, which are rarely systematically quantified. Researchers qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed prosody and facial expression productions in 22 male children and adolescents with high-functioning autism and 18 typically developing controls (17 males, 1 female). The authors used a story-retelling task to elicit emotionally laden narratives, which they analyzed using acoustic measures and perceptual codes. Naive listeners coded all productions for emotion type, degree of expressiveness and awkwardness.
The group with high-functioning autism was not significantly different in accuracy or expressiveness of facial productions, but was more awkward than the typically developing group. Participants with high-functioning autism were significantly more expressive in their vocal productions, with a trend for greater awkwardness. Researchers found that more severe social communication impairment, as captured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, was correlated with greater vocal and facial awkwardness.
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October 2013
Volume 18, Issue 10