More SLPs Use Traditional Interventions for Speech Sound Disorders Catch up on the latest findings by researchers in communication sciences and disorders in this round up of study results. Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2013
More SLPs Use Traditional Interventions for Speech Sound Disorders
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2013
More SLPs Use Traditional Interventions for Speech Sound Disorders
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 34-35. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18112013.34
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 34-35. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.18112013.34
Speech-language pathologists provided children ages 3 to 6 who had speech sound disorders with 30 or 60 minutes of treatment weekly, regardless of group or individual setting, according to survey results published in the July 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. The study confirms previous findings about the amount of service provided to this population.
Kansas State University researchers, led by Klaire Mann Brumbaugh, e-mailed a survey to 2,084 SLPs who worked in preelementary settings across the United States, asking about service delivery and interventions with children ages 3 to 6 who have speech sound disorders. More SLPs indicated that they used traditional intervention—focused on the correction of individual phonemes—than other types of intervention. However, many SLPs also reported using aspects of phonological intervention and providing phonological awareness training. Fewer SLPs indicated that they used nonspeech oral-motor exercises than in a previous survey. Recently graduated SLPs were no more familiar with recent advances in phonological intervention than their more experienced colleagues.
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November 2013
Volume 18, Issue 11