Online Tool Brings Researchers and Clinicians Together to Collaborate Researcher Cynthia Thompson of Northwestern University is heading a five-year project—funded with a $12 million NIH grant—to study language recovery in people with aphasia. The study will collect data from patients at three project sites and from other patients throughout the country. To enroll patients outside of the sites in ... ASHA News
Free
ASHA News  |   November 01, 2013
Online Tool Brings Researchers and Clinicians Together to Collaborate
Author Notes
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   November 01, 2013
Online Tool Brings Researchers and Clinicians Together to Collaborate
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 62. doi:10.1044/leader.AN6.18112013.62
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 62. doi:10.1044/leader.AN6.18112013.62
Researcher Cynthia Thompson of Northwestern University is heading a five-year project—funded with a $12 million NIH grant—to study language recovery in people with aphasia. The study will collect data from patients at three project sites and from other patients throughout the country.
To enroll patients outside of the sites in Chicago, Boston and Baltimore, Thompson and her colleagues are turning to CLARC (Clinicians and Researchers Collaborating), ASHA’s new online tool that matches clinicians and researchers interested in forming research collaborations.
Any clinician or researcher who is an ASHA member may participate in CLARC. Enrolling online as a researcher or clinician—or both, if appropriate—takes just a few minutes. Once enrolled, participants can search the database for “matches” and contact these potential collaborators to discuss the nature and purpose of the collaboration.
Thompson’s Center for the Neurobiology of Language Recovery will use different imaging methods to identify, monitor and evaluate brain-behavior changes within and across language domains in people with aphasia. Researchers will gather behavioral and neuroimaging data to examine the effects of treatment for selective language impairments in aphasia, investigate the course of language recovery and associated adaptive neuroplasticity, and identify cognitive and neural variables predictive of language and brain recovery.
Through CLARC, Thompson and her colleagues will identify clinicians who are interested in working with the study. The clinicians will deliver the state-of-the-art clinical protocols to their patients, and report data to the Center for the Neurobiology of Language Recovery.
Research collaborations are needed, Thompson says, to improve and inform the evidence base in communication sciences and disorders. “This collaboration has potential to improve access to state-of- the-art treatment for people with aphasia,” she says, “as well as to provide opportunities for clinicians interested in research and to generate a large network of professionals working together to make advancements in our understanding of the effects of treatment for aphasia.”
Clinicians and researchers interested in this type of collaboration are encouraged to enroll in CLARC. To enroll and for more information, including frequently asked questions, visit http://community.asha.org/CLARC.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2013
Volume 18, Issue 11