Dual-Language Support Benefits Bilingual Children With Hearing Loss Parents and clinicians can support both languages of bilingual children with hearing loss without adverse effects on the children’s language development, according to a study published in the July 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Moreover, supporting both languages in bilingual children with hearing loss may ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2013
Dual-Language Support Benefits Bilingual Children With Hearing Loss
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2013
Dual-Language Support Benefits Bilingual Children With Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, December 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18122013.36
The ASHA Leader, December 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.18122013.36
Parents and clinicians can support both languages of bilingual children with hearing loss without adverse effects on the children’s language development, according to a study published in the July 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Moreover, supporting both languages in bilingual children with hearing loss may have numerous positive effects.
A team led by Ferenc Bunta at the University of Houston investigated the effects of supporting both English and Spanish on language outcomes in bilingual children with hearing loss who used listening devices—cochlear implants and hearing aids. Researchers compared the English language skills of 20 bilingual children with hearing loss to those of 20 monolingual English-speaking peers with hearing loss. They also compared the bilingual participants’ Spanish and English language skills.
The authors collected auditory comprehension, expressive communication and total language scores using the Preschool Language Scale (4th ed.). On all three measures, the bilingual participants’ English language skills were commensurate with those of their monolingual English-speaking peers. The bilingual group’s Spanish and English total language scores were also comparable and highly correlated.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2013
Volume 18, Issue 12