Your Own Voice Could Affect Your Mood, Study Says Hearing your own voice sound happy, sad or fearful could alter your mood to fit that particular emotion, according to research from the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). Scientists from the CNRS have developed a digital audio platform—used in a new study published in Proceedings of the National ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2016
Your Own Voice Could Affect Your Mood, Study Says
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Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2016
Your Own Voice Could Affect Your Mood, Study Says
The ASHA Leader, May 2016, Vol. 21, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.21052016.14
The ASHA Leader, May 2016, Vol. 21, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.21052016.14
Hearing your own voice sound happy, sad or fearful could alter your mood to fit that particular emotion, according to research from the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS).
Scientists from the CNRS have developed a digital audio platform—used in a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences—that can change the emotional tone of a person’s voice as the person is talking.

“We wanted to investigate what kind of awareness people have of their own emotional expressions.”

“Very little is known about the mechanisms behind the production of vocal emotion,” says lead author Jean-Julien Aucouturier, researcher at CNRS’s Science and Technology of Music and Sound laboratory. “Previous research has suggested that people try to manage and control their emotions, for example hold back an expression or reappraise feelings. We wanted to investigate what kind of awareness people have of their own emotional expressions.”
Ninety-three participants—unaware their voices were being modified to be happy, sad or afraid—and also a control group, hearing no modification, read a short story aloud while listening to themselves through headphones. The researchers found that the participants’ emotional states changed accordingly to the manipulated emotion, which was created by digital audio processing algorithms that alter qualities such as pitch, inflection and dynamic range.
The results suggest that people could listen to their own voice as at least one means of gauging their emotional state, say the authors, who plan on making a downloadable version of the voice-altering program available online for other scientists to use in future research.
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May 2016
Volume 21, Issue 5