Secretions From Intracranial Tumor May Damage Inner Ear In some instances of intracranial tumors, toxic secretions may explain damage caused in the inner ear, according to new research from Massachusetts Eye and Ear. The study, published in Scientific Reports, explains why some cases of vestibular schwannoma, a sometimes-lethal tumor, cause hearing loss, even when the tumor isn’t large ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2016
Secretions From Intracranial Tumor May Damage Inner Ear
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Hearing Disorders / Balance & Balance Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2016
Secretions From Intracranial Tumor May Damage Inner Ear
The ASHA Leader, May 2016, Vol. 21, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.21052016.13
The ASHA Leader, May 2016, Vol. 21, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.21052016.13
In some instances of intracranial tumors, toxic secretions may explain damage caused in the inner ear, according to new research from Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The study, published in Scientific Reports, explains why some cases of vestibular schwannoma, a sometimes-lethal tumor, cause hearing loss, even when the tumor isn’t large enough to compress hearing structures nearby.
“What’s written in textbooks is that these tumors cause hearing loss by growing to the point of compressing the auditory nerve,” says lead author Konstantina M. Stankovic, an otologic surgeon and researcher at Mass. Eye and Ear. “We knew that it couldn’t be as simple as that, because there are large tumors that do not cause hearing loss and little ones that do.”
Stankovic and her team found that the toxic compound TNFa, which is known to cause other forms of hearing loss, was present in secretions from human vestibular schwannomas. Applying the secretions to a mouse cochlea, they found the resulting damage to cells correlated to severe hearing loss in humans.
In patients with vestibular schwannomas that aren’t causing hearing loss through compression of nerves in the internal auditory canal, the “findings suggest that there may be a pharmacologic way to maintain hearing,” Stankovic says, as there are known ways to inhibit bodily production of TNFa.
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May 2016
Volume 21, Issue 5