More Than 1 in 20 U.S. Children May Have Dizziness, Balance Problems Nearly 3.3 million U.S. children between 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to a large-scale nationally representative survey analyzed by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). From data collected on almost 11,000 children through parent responses, researchers led by NIDCD statistician Chuan-Ming ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2016
More Than 1 in 20 U.S. Children May Have Dizziness, Balance Problems
Author Notes
Article Information
Balance & Balance Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2016
More Than 1 in 20 U.S. Children May Have Dizziness, Balance Problems
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.21042016.18
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.21042016.18
Nearly 3.3 million U.S. children between 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to a large-scale nationally representative survey analyzed by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).
From data collected on almost 11,000 children through parent responses, researchers led by NIDCD statistician Chuan-Ming Li also found that children with hearing issues were twice as likely to have dizziness or balance problems compared to children with normal hearing.
“These findings suggest that dizziness and balance problems are fairly common among children, and parents and providers should be aware of the impact these problems can have on our children,” says pediatrician James F. Battey Jr., NIDCD director, and co-author of the study published in the Journal of Pediatrics. “Parents who notice dizziness and balance problems in their children should consult a health care provider to rule out a serious underlying condition.”

Children with hearing issues were twice as likely to have dizziness or balance problems compared to children with normal hearing.

Analyzing data from the Child Balance Supplement to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, the researchers found that girls are more likely to have dizziness and balance problems than boys (5.7 percent compared to 5.0 percent); non-Hispanic white children, at 6.1 percent, are also more likely to have these problems than Hispanic (4.6 percent) and non-Hispanic black children (4.3 percent).
Prevalence of balance issues and dizziness also increased with age. Children 15–17 (7.5 percent) and 12–14 (6.0 percent) were more likely to have these problems than children 6–8 (3.6 percent) and 3–5 (4.1 percent).
Parents of one-third of children with a reported dizziness or balance problem said their child had been diagnosed with an underlying condition, including neurological problems, ear infections, head or neck injuries, genetic causes, malformation of the ear and vision problems.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2016
Volume 21, Issue 4