Graduation Rate Continues to Lag for Students With Disabilities The nation’s on-time high school graduation rate hit a record 82.3 percent for the class of 2014—continuing a nearly decade-long upward trend—but that figure drops to 63.1 percent for students with disabilities. The figures, based on analysis of federal education data, come from a Grad Nation data brief produced by ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   April 01, 2016
Graduation Rate Continues to Lag for Students With Disabilities
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School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   April 01, 2016
Graduation Rate Continues to Lag for Students With Disabilities
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.21042016.13
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.21042016.13
The nation’s on-time high school graduation rate hit a record 82.3 percent for the class of 2014—continuing a nearly decade-long upward trend—but that figure drops to 63.1 percent for students with disabilities.
The figures, based on analysis of federal education data, come from a Grad Nation data brief produced by Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education.
In 33 states, according to the report, less than 70 percent of students with disabilities graduate. In seven of those states, that figure is less than 50 percent.
More than 50 percent of states have a general education graduation rate of at least 85 percent, but only one state—Arkansas—has an on-time graduation rate for students with disabilities that exceeds 80 percent.
In seven states, there is a gap of more than 30 points between the graduation rates for general education students and for students with disabilities.
The report notes that differences in graduation requirements and reporting account for some of the differences from state to state.
Other groups with severe gaps in graduation rates include students of color, students from low-income families, and English-language learners.
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April 2016
Volume 21, Issue 4